Missing a Tooth? You Have Options!

Can I Have New Teeth on The Same Day That I Lose My Teeth?

This question may rank as one of the most sought after requests that I receive.
There are very few people to whom this point does not matter.
Going around missing a tooth is not something that most people want to do.

However, we have to qualify precisely in which situations this is relevant.
It is also true that most people do not mind walking around with a missing tooth.
Didn’t I just contradict myself?
First I said that patients do not want to be seen without a tooth, and then I followed with the opposite statement.

Let us look at these two comments and allow me to explain how they are not contradictory.

When people don’t mind missing a tooth

Let’s start and deal with the second statement.
What do I mean by “most people do not mind walking around with a missing tooth?”
With this latter statement, I am referring to our molars or chewing teeth.
In fact, I have found, not only do people not mind missing these teeth for a short period, but they don’t mind losing a tooth and not replacing it for years!

This is despite the fact that their chewing is either impaired or altered.
To chew food efficiently, they may need to favor one side. Alternatively, the person may spend a long time chewing their food before it is ready to be swallowed.

What’s the big deal? No one can tell!

The rationale for not replacing the tooth follows the thought that eating at some level can still be done. After all, there are still other teeth!
Imagine if we would apply that logic to a finger. One could say, “the loss of a finger would not be so bad as I have nine others.”
Of course, we would never say this but with teeth, since the function is not eliminated entirely and “nobody sees my space,” then what is the big deal?

When it comes to missing a tooth, many put appearance over function

I just touched upon the point which explains my first statement regarding people not wanting to walk around toothless.

Losing a tooth that is obvious to everyone around me is a big deal. In fact, this could affect chewing even less than a back tooth.

The deal breaker is the embarrassment. Walking around missing a tooth that everyone can see, bothers most people.

I remember walking into a store one time and seeing the regular employees walking around with a surgical mask on her face. I thought that she was ill and was contagious.

Being the friendly fellow that I am, I asked if she was okay. She replied that she felt well. Oh… the reason for the mask was that her front tooth broke and she was embarrassed about her appearance.

This is like the old real estate dictum.
As the saying goes, the three most important things in real estate are Location, Location, and Location.

Well, the same applies to losing a tooth in the minds of most people. Our appearance to our friends and neighbors is more important than the loss of chewing function.

With today’s modern dentistry, being toothless is a thing of the past.

I’m not going to focus on the two sides of this discussion.

I want to point out and say that with modern materials, computers and skill of the dentist, being toothless is a thing of the past.
I can either actually create a duplicate of a tooth, that is removed, at the same time that I remove it.
Today, I can also use digital impressions, photographs, and x-rays to convey information to my laboratory to allow them to create a
duplicate of our removed tooth.
This procedure applies to front teeth as well as it pertains to back teeth.
It is applicable when I am doing a permanent bridge to replace a tooth or teeth, or when I am making a removable bridge to replace a tooth or teeth.
This applies to when I remove all of your teeth and make a denture or when I may give you teeth supported on implants.

The point is, with today’s modern dental technologies and techniques, you don’t have to live with missing a tooth.

Whether your concern is appearance, functionality or both, you have options and we can help you!

My goal is to give you options and hope!

If you need to lose a tooth or teeth and are worried about the potential embarrassment, please call me and let’s talk.
My goal is to give you options, and as many people say to me, give you hope.
We can discuss various paths to follow. With your help and input, we can fine tune those options to deliver what you need and what you want.
I can be reached at 440.951.7856. Just call Megan and ask to speak to me or make an appointment for a complimentary consultation.
I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Jeffrey Gross, DDSFAGD is an Ohio licensed general dentist and is on the staff of Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine.

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